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What Went Right - 3 APR 2017

Well, I've only fourteen more of these to go - better make 'em good! So here's three stories about "what went right" from my news feeds.

Dementia patients using robots, virtual reality to engage by Rebecca Turner (ABC Western Australia)

Contains video footage. People in dementia care in a number of facilities in Perth are receiving assistance from technological measures to help them feel more comfortable with interacting. These includes things like humanoid robots, virtual reality goggles, and virtual walls.

Remote WA communities cut off by flooding for months by Erin Parke (ABC Western Australia)

While there's concern about towns in New South Wales and Queensland which have been recently inundated by flood-waters, spare a thought for the folks in remote communities in WA's Kimberley, who have been largely isolated for about three months as a result of the big "wet" this year. While it's an expected part of the seasonal flow up there (so people start stockpiling food and fuel from about October and November onward) it's been a bit more intense than expected this year, so folks are giving a sigh of relief as the dirt roads start to dry out and become accessible again.

Albany-based whisky distillery gears up for national competition with 'millennia-old' local peat by Sean Murphy (Landline, ABC Western Australia)

A peat bog which was a liability for prime lamb and marron producer Richard Hughes is now "black gold" - a key ingredient in the Great Southern Distillery's prize-winning Limeburners single malt whisky.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found any stories about "what went right", why not share them in the comments, and boost the signal?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/97644.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: busy busy
What Went Right - Admin Post

Hi all,

I'm not doing a "what went right" post today. Instead, I'm going to be talking about the future of the series.

I'm sure you have noticed the times the posts are going up have been varying wildly over the last few weeks. Essentially, what's happening is I'm discovering that being at university is taking a toll on my spoon level I hadn't expected - I'm winding up physically and mentally exhausted by study to a greater degree than I expected, and something has to give. The thing which is "giving" at present is my sleep cycle - I'm finding instead of being able to get away with about 6 - 7 hours, I'm needing the full 8, sometimes 9 hours per night. Given I put these posts up in the morning not long after I get up, they're getting pushed further and further back as my need for rest increases. There are other side effects of this physical and mental exhaustion as well - suffice it to say, I'm going to have to stop posting "What Went Right" because I need the spoons it occupies for other things.

I'm currently thinking of finishing up this series on 17 April. It will have been a four month run (from 18 December 2016) and that's a pretty solid duration for one of my projects. I'm disappointed at not being able to keep it going for longer, but unfortunately, between the demands of university and the constraints of mental illness, I'm finding the whole thing to be creating more stress for me than it's resolving. Again, something has to give, and this is the thing I can shed from my load with the least adverse consequences to myself.

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/97450.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: contemplative contemplative
What Went Right - 1 APR 2017

Happy April Fools' Day. Have three stories about "What went right" from my news feeds.

Commercial merino ewes hit record prices in Western Australia by Michelle Stanley (WA Country Hour, ABC Western Australia)

A new record high price for commercial merino ewes has been set in WA's Great Southern Region. There's been a short supply of quality breeding ewes; thus the high prices.

Western Australia's inland lakes become breeding grounds for thousands of waterbirds by Eliza Wood (WA Country Hour, ABC Western Australia)

In the wake of all the rain which fell in the North of WA over the last few months, a lot of the inland lakes have filled. This has attracted water birds from all over to breed.

Inside the Square Kilometre Array by Anne Jones (Off Track, ABC Australia)

A profile of various people and places associated with the Square Kilometre Array telescope in Western Australia. (This includes the traditional custodians of the land, as well as astronomers and computer scientists).

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story about "what went right" in your news feed, why not share it in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/97166.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: awake awake
What Went Right - 31 MAR 2017

Another month over already? Where does the time go? Have three stories about "what went right" from my news feed to help you through the day.

Cyclone Debbie: Airlie Beach and Proserpine locals pull together despite lack of power, water by Katherine Gregory (AM, ABC Australia)

The towns of Airlie Beach and Prosperine were directly in the path of Cyclone Debbie, and have suffered extensive damage. However, locals are starting to work to clean up the mess, and are working to help each other out.

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews flags legal changes after meeting teen 'humiliated' by rape court case by ABC Victoria (uncredited)

The Premier of Victoria has met with a young woman who was raped, and who wound up dropping the court case against the men who raped her due to re-victimisation by the court system. She and her mother are campaigning for reform to the legal system in regard to rape cases to reduce the future likelihood of re-victimisation.

#SnapthatStigma: Children in state care speak out during campaign to fight stereotypes by Angelique Donnellan (ABC South Australia)

Kids in state care have a lot of extra stuff to deal with in their lives on top of the standard load of growing up and becoming adults. One of the things they're forced to deal with is the stigma of being "in care". A group of eight of them have spoken up about living with and dealing with this stigma in a video produced by the Create Foundation.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story in your news feeds about "what went right", why not share it in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/96996.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: calm calm
What Went Right - 30 MAR 2017

Yeah, this is late today (I've been having a bit of a slow start to the day). But there's still at least three things which went right in my news feed, and here they are:

From foster kid to hopeful surgeon: Young people in care recognised for achievements by Eliza Laschon (ABC Western Australia)

This article profiles three of the 25 winners of the Perth Airport Achiever Awards, a grant of $4000, given to young people who have been in care, or who have left care, and who are looking to continue education and training.

Lizards quick to snap up 1080 baits meant for WA wild dogs by Eliza Wood (ABC Rural, Western Australia)

Pastoralists and farmers have been saying for years that 1080 baits are ineffective against wild dogs in WA, because the dogs don't take them. Now research out of Murdoch University is proving them right - not only are the baits usually quickly snapped up by varanids (monitor lizards) as well as other species such as ravens, kangaroos, ants and feral cats; but even when the lizards go into hibernation for the winter, the dogs aren't eating the baits in the first place.

Quokkas thriving on Rottnest Island despite increased tourism, study finds by Charlotte Hamlyn

The quokkas of Rottnest Island have been notorious ever since Willem de Vlamingh first mistook them for rats and named the island for them (the literal translation from the Dutch is "rat's nest"). But very little has been known about the population (despite them getting an online reputation as "the happiest animal in the world") until recently, when researcher Veronica Phillips undertook the first thorough study of the quokka population there in about forty years, in order to find out whether tourism on the island is harming them.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story about "what went right" in your news feed, why not share it in the comments and boost the signal?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/96731.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: calm calm
What Went Right - 29 MAR 2017

Another day, another three things about "what went right" from my news feeds.

Gravity Discovery Centre observatory: a place to explore the wonders of the cosmos and origins of life by Emma Wynne (ABC Radio Perth, Western Australia)

A profile piece about the Gravity Discovery Centre observatory at Gingin, and its senior astronomer, Richard Tonello.

Hardy inland spangled perch make the most of heavy WA rains as desert creek beds turn to rivers by Rachel Day (ABC Goldfields, Western Australia)

A chance discovery of small fish flipping about on the side of a flooded road in the Goldfields reveals the spangled perch - a desert fish which is incredibly hardy and can survive a wide range of conditions.

Young WA farming family grows eco-house out of cereal crop by Lisa Morrison (ABC Great Southern, Western Australia)

The Maesepp-Potter family in Katanning live in an off-grid, straw-bale house they built from materials sourced on their working sheep and grain farm (the straw-bales were barley straw grown on the farm, the thermal walls are rock sourced from the northern end of their property). They're opening the doors of their home to the public as part of the Great Southern Sustainable Living festival.

So there's my three for the day. If you've seen any articles about what went right in your news feeds, why not share a link in the comments, and boost the signal?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/96403.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: tired tired
What Went Right - 28 MAR 2017

My best wishes for anyone in Northern Queensland reading this - here's hoping Cyclone Debbie turns out to be a bit less ferocious than expected. In the meantime, here's the three things from my newsfeeds about what went right.

Kimberley abattoir resumes production after big wet season by Matt Brann (ABC Rural, Western Australia)

The only abbatoir in the north-west of Australia, at Yeeda Station between Broome and Derby, has re-opened after the wet season.

'Energy-harvesting' clear glass created by Perth team by Briana Shepherd (ABC Western Australia)

The Electron Science Research Institute at Edith Cowan University, and local firm ClearVue technologies have worked together to create a commercially viable, clear, solar glass. The glass contains special nanoparticles, with solar cells around its borders, and can block the UV and infra-red components of sunlight transferring those energies to the solar cells to create energy, while passing the visible light through to provide illumination.

World's biggest dinosaur footprints found in north-western Australia by Ben Collins (ABC Kimberley, Western Australia)

Footprints of sauropod dinosaurs, measuring at up to 1.7m in length, have been documented in the north-west of Western Australia, on the coastline north of Broome. They're one of up to 21 different types of dinosaurs represented in the area.

So there's my three for the day. If you've spotted a story about "what went right" in your news feeds, why not share it in the comments, and boost the signal.

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/96088.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: busy busy
What Went Right - 27 MAR 2017

Bit rushed today, but still able to fit in three things which went right from my newsfeeds.

Earthquake rattles Darwin after striking 600km away in Banda Sea by Xavier La Canna (ABC Radio Darwin, Northern Territory)

A magnitude 5.3 earthquake in the Banda Sea rattled Darwin at about 4.44am (ACST), but isn't likely to have caused much damage.

Is Australia on the brink of becoming a completely cashless society? by Michael Edwards (ABC AM, Australia)

It's rumoured Australia could become a cashless society as early as 2020, with the Reserve Bank's roll-out of the NPP (New Payment Platform) happening today looking to be a big step in the process.

Study shows fibre supplements could be used as asthma treatment by Justine Kearney (ABC Australia)

A small preliminary study (with a sample group of 17 asthmatics) has had encouraging results with the use of soluble fibre supplements as a way of treating or controlling asthma. The researchers involved are now looking to broaden their study to a much wider sample group.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found an article in your news feed about what went right, why not share it in the comments to boost the signal?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/95835.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: busy busy
What Went Right - 26 MAR 2017

I feel I've been saying "good grief, where does the year go?" a lot lately. But really - the end of March already? Feels like just yesterday was the beginning of January. Anyway, have another three articles from my mainstream media feeds about "what went right".

Pearl producers turn wasted by-product into seafood delicacy by Tyne Logan (ABC Western Australia)

Great Southern Shellfish, based in Albany, have started selling pearl oysters which are unsuitable for producing pearls as oysters for eating. The akoya oysters, which are raised in beds where other seafood for consumption are grown, are reported as tasting more like abalone than rock oyster, but local chefs are giving the product the thumbs-up.

Dance Academy writer Samantha Strauss says creating children's TV isn't all fun and games by Jade Macmillan (ABC Australia)

Samantha Strauss, the co-creator of ABC TV series Dance Academy, uses her own experience as a dancer to inform the way she writes the show. The series has spawned a film version, which is picking up eighteen months on from where the TV show left off.

Keeping South Australia's' Barossa Deutsch alive over kaffee und kuchen by Simon Royal (ABC South Australia)

Efforts are being made to keep the Barossa Deutsch (the dialect of German which evolved in the Barossa valley) alive by getting people who speak the language together for "kaffe und kuchen" (coffee and cakes). Professor Peter Mickan, a linguist, also interviews the remaining native speakers of the language, gaining knowledge of the language from them by this means.

So there's my three stories for the day. If you've found any articles about "what went right" in your news feeds, why not share them in the comments, and boost the signal?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/95492.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: busy busy
What Went Right - 25 MAR 2017

Ah, it's Saturday, and I have plans to spend a lot of time doing very little. But I still have time to find three articles from my mainstream media feeds about "what went right" rather than "what went wrong".

Loggerhead turtles at Gnaraloo enjoy bumper nesting season in boost for endangered species by Sarah Tallier (ABC Western Australia)

It's been a bumper nesting season for loggerhead turtles this year at Gnaraloo, on the Ningaloo coast - over four hundred nests have been spotted this season.

World Science Festival: Reef twilight zone offers coral and species protection by Maudy Veltema (ABC Queensland)

When we talk of coral reefs, we often think of shallow, warm water - but corals can live at depths up to 700m below the surface. Dr Tom Bridge, senior curator of Queensland Museum, studies coral species and ecosystems in the tricky-to study mesophotic zone between 50m to 150m underwater.

US Air Force installs remote-controlled telescope in Western Australia to monitor space junk by Emma Wynne (ABC Radio Perth, Western Australia)

The US Air Force is trying to keep track of approximately 20,000 human-manufactured objects in space, in order to try and either prevent, predict or deal with the fall-out of collisions between them. This latest telescope in Gingin is part of the Falcon project, which is aimed at giving the US air force oversight of all objects larger than 10cm in Earth's orbit.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story about "what went right" in your news feed, why not share a link to it in the comments, and boost the signal?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/95297.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: relaxed relaxed
What Went Right - 24 MAR 2017

Another week almost over. Have three stories from my mainstream media feeds about "what went right".

Kimberley's iconic 'prison tree' never used as holding cell for Aboriginal prisoners by Vanessa Mills and Leah McLennan (ABC Kimberley, Western Australia)

This is less of a "what went right" and more of a "setting the record right". The so-called "prison boab" outside Derby in Western Australia has never actually been used as a holding cell for prisoners. Research by Dr Elizabeth Grant of the University of Adelaide is indicating the tree may, instead, be a sacred interment site for the local Aboriginal people, and Dr Grant is calling for efforts to be made to protect the tree as such.

Synlight: Germany fires up 'world's largest artificial sun' in push for climate-friendly energy by AP (uncredited)

The world's largest "artificial sun" has been created in Germany in an effort to see whether there might be a commercially viable way of using sunlight to generate hydrogen.

DNA repair discovery could lead to drugs to reverse ageing, fight cancer and help space travel by Jake Sturmer (national science reporter, ABC Australia)

An international research team has identified a critical step in the way cells repair DNA, bringing us closer to a point where anti-ageing drugs may well be theoretically possible.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found any stories about "what went right" in your news feeds, why not share them in the comments and boost the signal? There's more going right out there than we'd think at first scan of the news.

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/95037.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: tired tired
What Went Right - 23 MAR 2017

I'm going to be having a busy day today - housework and study combined. But I'm not too busy to stop and look for three articles about "what went right" in my mainstream media feeds. Here they are.

Night parrot sighting in Western Australia shocks birdwatching world by Ann Jones ("Off Track", RN, ABC Western Australia)

The photo is of the south end of a north-bound bird which looks like a rather plump yellow budgie. But it's a night parrot - a bird which was presumed to be extinct until about four years ago; and it was up near Broome in Western Australia, about 2000 km from their current known habitat in Western Queensland. One thing for certain, night parrots are full of surprises!

Pilot clean-up program hailed as answer to Western Australia's abandoned mines by Sam Tomlin (ABC Goldfields, Western Australia)

The WA Department of Mines and Petroleum says its growing Mine Rehabilitation Fund is the answer to the question of what happens when mining finishes or stops abruptly, and leaves a minesite needing to be rehabilitated. The fund, which consists of a levy of 1% on the annual profits of any mining company in Western Australia, has been running since 2013, and is intended to cover the costs of rehabilitation and clean-up. So far, it's been used to cover the rehabilitation costs of the Pro Force gold mine near Coolgardie, and the Black Diamond coal mine near Collie.

Mouldy food could be a thing of the past thanks to Murdoch University research by Sarah Collard

Research at Murdoch University by Dr Kirsty Bayliss is aimed at finding the optimal type of plasma flame to treat various types of food (fruit, bread, meat, grains, dairy products) in order to prevent mould infections. At present, they're focussing on avocados, and finding some interesting results. The plasma flame not only kills off the mould spores on the surface of fruit, but also appears to stimulate a resistance response within the fruit itself.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found any stories about "what went right" in your news feed, why not share them in the comments, and boost the signal.

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/94952.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: busy busy
What Went Right - 22 MAR 2017

Winter is coming here in Australia - we've passed the autumnal equinox, and things are going to be getting cooler and wetter down in the south of the country (cooler and drier up in the north, where they're going into the Dry). Which means for those of you in the Northern Hemisphere, spring is on the way (and probably springing already!). Anyway, enough of these tedious meteorological details - let's get on to the stories about what went right.

Vietnamese refugee with big heart builds life and helps community in Western Australia by Gian De Poloni (ABC South West WA)

This article is a profile of Hien Le, a former refugee who fled Vietnam in 1982, and who has built up a life in Western Australia, teaching herself English by watching "Days of Our Lives" and "The Young and The Restless". She also spends time helping Vietnamese girls who have moved to Australia for a shot at a better life.

Tropical Forestry Services becomes Quintis as the company shifts focus by Clint Jasper (ABC Rural, Western Australia)

In a market plagued by organised crime and fraud, Australian company Quintis hopes to be able to build a brand reputation as a reliable supplier of sustainable, ethically sourced sandalwood timber and oil. They're also running a company in the USA which is trialling sandalwood oil as a treatment for various skin conditions.

WA's dinosaur coast: Bid to protect Broome's ancient footprints after maps published by Erin Parke (ABC 7.30, Western Australia)

A map is being produced as a result of field research by a team from the University of Queensland into the dinosaur tracks around Broome. This may provide opportunities for increased tourism around the footprints, although local Aboriginal families are concerned about the potential for damage, and even theft. This concern is shared by the local Dinosaur Coast Management Group, who are a group of concerned locals aiming to protect the trackways.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found any stories about "what went right", why not share them in the comments and boost the signal?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/94643.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: positive positive
What Went Right - 21 MAR 2017

Happy autumnal equinox to everyone in the southern hemisphere. Happy vernal equinox to all of you in the northern hemisphere. And in celebration, have three articles about "What Went Right" from my news feeds.

Wine yields doubled in parts of Western Australia, but rain takes shine off the 2016 vintage by Michelle Stanley (WA Country Hour, ABC Western Australia)

It's been a good year for vineyards in WA, with some areas in Margaret River approximately doubling their harvest from their vines.

Blaze Aid helping flooded West Australian farmers get back on their feet by Tara de Landgrafft (WA Country Hour, ABC Western Australia)

The aid group "Blaze Aid", formed in the wake of the bushfires which took out Yarloop last year, is now providing assistance for farmers who were flooded out by heavy rains about five weeks ago. The group provides assistance in replacing or re-erecting fences, and they're currently working on about 50km of fencing in the Lake Grace area, with an expectation of more to come.

Diabetes sufferers swimming their way to a healthier lifestyle by Charlotte Hamlyn (ABC Western Australia)

The Swimming365 group is going to be entering a team in the "Port to Pub" event (which starts at Leighton beach, and ends at the Rottnest hotel). The group is composed of people who have started swimming as a way of either avoiding or dealing with type 2 diabetes, and this is the first time they've entered a team in the event.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story or two about "what went right" in your news feed, why not share a link in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/94298.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: sleepy sleepy
What Went Right - 20 MAR 2017

Nearly equinox already - where does the year get to? Anyway, have three articles from my mainstream media feeds about "what went right" rather than "what went wrong".

South African sailors rescued from crippled yacht off WA coast after mast breaks by David Weber (ABC Western Australia)

Three South African men have been rescued from their yacht, Jedi 1, which was crippled when the mast broke off. The rescue was performed by the rescue jet Challenger, and the crew of HMAS Parramatta. They're expected to arrive in Albany at some point this afternoon (Monday).

Drone tested by Albany sea rescuers at Salmon Holes set to help in emergencies by Angus Sargent (ABC Western Australia)

A privately acquired drone was tested by the Albany Sea Rescue at the Salmon Holes fishing spot, a place notorious for drownings. The drone is intended to fill in for "spotter" aircraft or helicopters, which aren't readily available in the area.

NSW hospital parking fees to be cut following 14yo's petition by Lily Mayers (ABC New South Wales)

The cost of parking at hospitals in New South Wales is being cut for people who visit hospital more than twice a week, or for more than a week. Instead of being around $200 a week, the cost per week for those people will be capped at $21.20. The changes come into effect from July 1.

So there's my three for the day. If you've spotted an article about what went right, why not share a link to it in the comments and boost the signal?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/94039.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: busy busy
What Went Right - 19 MAR 2017

Another day, another three things from my mainstream media feeds about "what went right".

Chuck Berry, rock 'n' roll's founding guitar hero and storyteller, dies aged 90 by ABC Australia (uncredited)

Ninety years is a good long time, and Chuck Berry filled them. He was one of the iconic musicians of his generation, and this obituary piece gives a history of the man and his influence.

Washed-up luggage leads emergency services to injured men in crashed helicopter by ABC Queensland (uncredited)

Two men whose helicopter crashed near Curtis Island in Queensland were rescued after their luggage started being washed up on beaches near Gladstone. Originally, rescue workers had been looking for a capsized boat, but after consulting with the family members of the men (discovered through tags on the luggage) they learned they were looking for a helicopter. The men are recovering in Rockhampton Base Hospital.

Laser trialled to frighten birds from Adelaide Hills vineyard by Lauren Waldhunter (ABC South Australia)

It's a late vintage this year in South Australia, and the biggest issue a lot of wineries have at this time of the year is hungry birds flocking to the vines to feast on the grapes. A winery in South Australia is attempting something new this year, using a green laser to send out a random series of light patterns across the vineyard and into the trees, in an effort to scare the birds away. No birds are harmed by the laser - the aim is just to scare them off.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found something in your news feeds about "what went right", why not share a link in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/93762.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: cold cold
What Went Right - 18 MAR 2017

It's Saturday (already? Where does the week go?). Have three articles about "what went right" from my mainstream news feeds.

Pilbara locals swap high vis for waders as oyster trial plans progress by Eliza Wood (ABC Western Australia)

A former pearling lease in Karratha may be turned into a site for growing edible oysters if a feasibility study by the Maxima Pearling Company works out right. The area used to grow pearl oysters, but had to close due to disease in 2008. The oyster farm would be a joint venture between the Maxima Pearling Company and the traditional owners of the area, represented by the Murujuga Aboriginal Corporation.

What Kikkoman's iconic soy sauce bottle says about Japan by Colin Bisset (Blueprint for Living, ABC Radio National, Australia)

The Kikkoman soy sauce bottle seems both ubiquitous and invisible, but there's a lot going on behind the clever little design. This article profiles both the bottle and its designer, Kenji Eukan.

African painted dog: Perth zoologist devotes his life to saving endangered, misunderstood animal by Emma Wynne (ABC Radio Perth)

Perth Zoo's John Lemon is devoted to saving the African Painted Dog from extinction. He's the founder of Painted Dog Conservation Incorporated, which works in three countries in Africa (Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Namibia) to increase numbers of the dog, reduce poaching, and persuade local communities that maintaining a diverse range of wildlife is a key to tourism income.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found a story in your news feeds about "what went right", why not share a link in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/93655.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: awake awake
What Went Right - 17 MAR 2017

Happy St Patrick's Day to anyone who's interested. Have three things which went right from the mainstream media I read, in celebration!

Holocaust survivor pays tribute to Swedish diplomat who saved tens of thousands of Hungarian Jews by Briana Shepherd (ABC Western Australia)

An exhibition in memory of Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg is touring Australia. Mr Wallenberg is credited with saving tens of thousands of Hungarian Jews during World War II. The exhibit is showing in the Curtin University exhibition space on St George's Terrace until March 30.

Ben Wyatt making history as first Aboriginal treasurer in Australian state or federal government by David Weber (ABC Western Australia)

Member for Victoria Park, Ben Wyatt, is the first Aboriginal person to occupy the office of Treasurer in any Australian state or federal government. The article is mainly in discussion with Mr Wyatt's uncle, Federal Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt, putting the achievement into context, and pointing out the fact the two of them effectively have an extra responsibility alongside their responsibilities to their party, their constituents, their ministerial portfolios, and their overall responsibility to state and country: they also have a responsibility toward Indigenous people, to be advocates, mentors and role models there.

Why this bush stone-curlew is in love with its own reflection by Patrick Williams (ABC Queensland)

Stone curlews are normally nocturnal birds, so they don't often see their own reflections. Which means if they get a chance to see a reflection of themselves, they tend to be fascinated by the sight of it. An example of this (complete with a helpful sign from a Wildcare Australia volunteer explaining the situation) became popular on social media yesterday.

So there's my three stories about what went right. If you've found anything which went right in your news feed, why not share a link to it in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/93372.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: happy happy
What Went Right - 16 MAR 2017

Once again, three things from my mainstream media feed about what went right (or what is going right, or could be going right) rather than what went wrong.

WA cider producer tips traditional market to take off in Australia by Lisa Morrison and Tyne Logan (WA Country Hour, ABC Western Australia)

This is a profile of the Denmark Heritage Cider Company, which produces traditional, English-style apple cider from traditional cider apple varieties (as opposed to the eating apple varieties used by most Australian cider makers) and ferments the brew in the traditional fashion, with a year's maturation and ageing. The aim is to produce a premium cider product, which attracts discerning drinkers.

Perth cyclists create goat drawing across the suburbs using ride-tracking app Strava by Emma Wynne (ABC Radio Perth, Western Australia)

What do you get as a result of a 202km bike ride around Perth? You get a very good picture of a goat on the ride-tracking app, Strava. The group responsible, amateur cycling team "Fight Club" are pleased with the reception their effort has been getting online, and are thinking about trying for a more iconic Western Australian animal (a numbat or quokka) for their next effort.

Study finds waves of Margaret River drive economic growth by Anthony Pancia (ABC South West WA)

Having a good surf break near your town is probably driving a bit more money to the town itself. According to research by University of Sydney assistant professor Samuel Willis, and Oxford economics candidate Thomas McGregor, a high-quality surf break could add up to 2.2 percentage points to a region's economic growth. (There's a link to the actual paper in the ABC article).

So there's my three for the day. If you've found an article about something which went right, or is going right, or could be going right, why not share a link to it in the comments, and boost the signal?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/93116.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: grumpy grumpy
What Went Right - 15 MAR 2017

Good grief, Wednesday already? Have another three stories from the mainstream media about "what went right".

Driverless bus trial notches up 2,000 passengers by Eliza Borello (AM, ABC Australia)

A driverless bus which is having a trial run in South Perth, Western Australia, has carried about 2000 passengers so far, and is largely getting a positive reception. The bus, which has a maximum speed of about 45 kilometres per hour, is currently run at between 11 - 14kph, and is equipped with sensors to detect obstacles. There's also a requirement for a chaperone who is able to grab the controls in an emergency (the bus is a level 4 driverless vehicle).

Momentum builds for resurrecting Ord Valley cotton industry by Matt Brann (ABC Rural, Western Australia)

The last time cotton was sown in the Ord River area was back in 2011, when 800 hectares were planted in order to take advantage of high prices. However, with the expansion of the Ord River irrigation scheme, Kimberley Agricultural Investment is looking to make cotton their preferred broadacre crop (rather than sugar cane). The hope is to get a commercial cotton industry up and running by about 2019, and then consider whether a processing plant in Kununurra is a viable investment.

Antidepressants could soon be rivalled by device emitting tiny electric shocks, researchers hope by Sarah Collard (ABC Western Australia)

There's growing evidence of the efficacy of a device which sends small electric shocks to the brain to stimulate under-performing areas as a treatment option for depression. The device is being said to be potentially at least as useful as anti-depressant drugs as a treatment option, adding to the range of options in the treatment spectrum. It also doesn't have the same sorts of side effects as many anti-depressants, which potentially makes it a more attractive option.

So there's my three articles for the day. If you've found any articles in your news feeds about "what went right", why not share them in the comments?

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