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What Went Right - 15 FEB 2017

Another three stories about "what went right" (rather than "what went wrong) from the mainstream media.

Australian scientists make breakthrough in fight against superbugs by Tom Wildie (ABC Western Australia)

A research team at the University of Western Australia have worked out the three-dimensional structure of a protein which is responsible for multiple drug resistant bacteria. The protein in question masks the bacteria from the immune system and from antibiotics.

Ord Valley farmer returns from Brazil study tour with lessons on tropical agriculture and wet season cropping by Matt Brann (ABC Rural, Western Australia)

Kalyn Fletcher has returned from a study tour of Brazil, where she was learning about how Brazilians handle tropical agriculture, and comparing this against methods currently in use in Australia. She was particularly interested in wet season cropping, an area where the Australian system is currently experiencing limited success.

Turtles nesting on Raine Island receive helping hand in bid for survival by Kristy Sexton-McGrath and Stephanie Small (ABC Queensland)

The number of green turtle hatchlings at the Raine Island National Park in Queensland has more than doubled, with the aid of a joint conservation project sponsored by the Queensland government, the Great Barrier Reef foundation, and BHP Billiton. The project has involved creating more hatching space, and reducing the risks to the turtles on the island.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found any stories about "what went right" in your news feeds, why not share a link to them in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/85324.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: calm calm
What Went Right - 14 FEB 2017

Running a bit late today, but here's three stories from my mainstream media feeds about "what went right" rather than "what went wrong".

Horticulture producers to get better system to resolve disputes with traders under new code by Sarina Locke (ABC Rural, New South Wales)

The Federal government is working to reform the Horticultural Code of Conduct, after finding in review it was inefficient, and largely ignored by both growers and traders.

Are lupin flakes the next big superfood? by Eliza Borello (AM, ABC Radio)

A profile of The Lupin Co, a new WA-based food business aiming to crack into the Australian wellness market with their product.

Energy Australia boss says national plan for renewable energy is solution to high power prices by Elysse Morgan (Business reporter, ABC Australia)

Energy Australia, one of the largest operators of coal-fired power stations, has joined the growing chorus of groups which are calling for an end to blame-slinging over renewables, and for Australia's federal politicians to join in a non-partisan push for clean energy.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found any stories about "what went right" in your media feeds, why not leave a link to them in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/85028.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: lethargic lethargic
What Went Right - 13 FEB 2017

Once again, three articles from the mainstream media about "what went right" rather than "what went wrong".

Bankwest cuts negative gearing benefits from home loan assessments by Michael Janda (Business reporter, ABC Australia)

Bankwest has fallen into line with industry best practice, and is no longer using the consideration of tax concessions gained from negative gearing in order to determine whether or not a customer is able to service a loan.

Industry, environment, community groups demand bipartisan energy policy by Peta Donald (Political reporter, AM, ABC Australia)

An alliance of groups from the business, industrial, union, environmental, community and social services sectors have issued a call for Australian political leaders to cut out the partisan parliamentary antics, and get on with working together to create a bipartisan energy policy which will deliver reliable, affordable and clean energy.

Sailing legend Peter Mounsey shares sea tales at Australian Wooden Boat Festival by Ted O'Connor and Felicity Ogilvie (ABC Tasmania)

This article is a profile of Peter Mounsey, who has been fascinated with the sea ever since he served in the merchant navy during World War II. He's in his eighties, and doesn't appear to have slowed down at all, sailing from Sydney to Hobart in a small yacht to participate in the Australian Wooden Boat Festival.

So there's my three for today. If you've found any articles about what went right in your media feeds, why not share a link to them in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/84915.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: awake awake
What Went Right - 12 FEB 2017

Three more stories from the mainstream media about "what went right" rather than "what went wrong".

Ravensthorpe cut off by floodwater, chopper sent to rescue stranded drivers by Nicolas Perpitch (ABC Western Australia)

It's a bit damp down Ravensthorpe way, with roads cut by flood waters in all directions. A group of six cars containing about fifteen people were caught between floodways, and wound up needing to get evacuated by helicopter. All safe and sound now, so that went right, anyway.

AFL Women's: Football players from diverse backgrounds aim to rise to top by Damian McIver (ABC Grandstand, Victoria)

The AFL is using the growing popularity of the AFLW season to get more girls from Indigenous and non-English speaking backgrounds interested in the game, and hopefully grow the numbers of women from these backgrounds participating in the women's leagues.

Sydney Harbour hidden plastic pollution is killing endangered turtles and marine life by Nicole Chettle (ABC New South Wales)

The "what went right" in this one is the story of "Clifton", a juvenile green turtle who has been undergoing treatment for plastic ingestion in the Taronga Wildlife Hospital, and is now recovering nicely, with a view to being released once he's back up to a good weight. The wider story is about plastics polluting Sydney Harbour (and indeed, Australia's marine environment in general) and causing problems for wildlife.

So there's my three about "what went right" for today. If you've found stories about "what went right" in your news feeds, why not share a link to them in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/84702.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: indescribable indescribable
What Went Right - 11 FEB 2017

Another three stories from the mainstream media about "what went right" rather than "what went wrong".

Kalgoorlie engineer lip reads her way to diverse mining career by Bettina Arrow and Rachel Day (ABC Goldfields, Western Australia)

A profile of Jayne Finch, who wound up contracting meningococcal disease as a 21 year old, which destroyed her hearing. It hasn't stopped her completing a geology degree, and going on to a diverse career in the mining industry.

Year of the rooster Australian gold, silver and opal coins a boon for Perth Mint by Babs McHugh (ABC Rural, Western Australia)

The Perth Mint has been doing brisk business in commemorative coins for the Lunar New Year, with the silver and opal coins selling out (silver coin with opal rooster emblem). They also do a solid gold coin with a rooster emblem, which is selling well too.

Emoji inventor Shigetaka Kurita says MoMA New York acquisition 'feels like a dream' by Rachel Mealey (Tokyo reporter, ABC Australia)

The original 177 emoji have been added to the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York, which both surprises and pleases their inventor, Shigetaka Kurita.

So there's the three for today. If you've found anything in your mainstream media feed about "what went right", why not share a link to it in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/84342.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: awake awake
What Went Right - 10 FEB 2017

Another three articles from my mainstream media feeds about "what went right" rather than "what went wrong".

WA weather: South-West hit with flooding, blackouts in February downpour by Graeme Powell (ABC Western Australia)

Perth has recorded it's second wettest February day on record, receiving more than 106mm of rain since 9.00am Thursday. Despite flooding, there have been no accidents caused by aquaplaning vehicles.

Asian Comedy Invasion seeking laughs at Perth's Fringe World Festival by Courtney Bembridge (ABC Western Australia)

"A group of rising Asian comedy stars has arrived in Perth for a series of shows as part of the Fringe World Festival. Australian comedian Ro Campbell has imported the stand-up comedians from India, Malaysia and Singapore for the festival, after a number of emerging Asian artists caught his attention."

High school artists hung at Art Gallery of WA for 25th graduates show by Emma Wynne (ABC Radio Perth)

Every year for the past quarter-century, the WA Art Gallery has held an exhibition of the best artwork by Year 12 students. This year is no exception, and it looks like there's some good works on view.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found some stories about "what went right" in your news feeds, why not share a link to them in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/84206.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: lethargic lethargic
What Went Right - 9 FEB 2017

Once again, another three stories from the mainstream media about "what went right" rather than "what went wrong".

Beyond the stereotypes: Meet the teachers and students at Perth's Langford Islamic College by Emma Wynne (ABC Radio Perth)

A profile of the staff and students of the Langford Islamic College, in Perth's southern suburbs. The staff are a mix of people who follow Islam and people who don't, the curriculum is very much the standard Western Australian school curriculum (with a few added extras, such as Arabic and Islamic Studies), and the main visible difference is the girls are encouraged to wear the hijab after year four, and cover up a bit more.

Perth Zoo welcomes second puggle from short-beaked echidnas Chindi and Nyingarn by Eliza Laschon (ABC Western Australia)

The Perth Zoo's captive breeding program for the short-beaked echidna has resulted in a second puggle (sex not yet known) from a particular set of parents (10th overall), and more information they can put toward a potential breeding program for the endangered long-beaked echidna.

Shorebird record in Albany WA highest in six years by Lisa Morrison (ABC Great Southern, Western Australia)

As part of the national shorebird monitoring program (Shorebird 2020), coordinated by Birdlife Australia, Albany observers have counted 560 birds, across 15 species. This is an improvement on previous years (up from a low of 351 in 2014) but is far from the sorts of numbers which used to be seen in the late 1990s. It's hoped the information from the count can aid in conservation efforts and habitat retention.

So there's my three for the day. It's been a good day for stories about what went right today, so I'll probably drop all the other stories I found into the comments. If you've found something in your news feed about "what went right", why not share a link in the comments as well?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/83874.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: groggy groggy
What Went Right - 8 FEB 2017

Once more, three articles from the mainstream media about "what went right" rather than what's going wrong.

Harvey bait factory churning out cane toad sausages to protect Kimberley wildlife by Matt Brann (ABC Rural, Western Australia)

In a bid to save native wildlife (especially predators) from cane toad poisoning, a special sausage containing cane toad meat has been created by a Harvey bait factory. The hope is native predators will eat the sausage, and wind up vomiting from the taste, causing aversion to the taste of cane toads in future. The sausages are planned to be used in a trial for the procedure on the Mitchell Plateau in March.

Homelessness in WA's South West brought into focus by Bunbury artist by Jacqueline Lynch (ABC Western Australia)

Bunbury photographer Kate Heaslip is running an exhibition of photographs of people who are sleeping rough in the Bunbury and Busselton area. The project is an effort at making these people visible again, rather than invisible.

(This is something which is "going right" because it's about making these people recognisable as humans, rather than socially invisible).

Australia's first school lawyer offers support to disadvantaged kids by Jeremy Story Carter (The Law Report, ABC Radio National)

Vincent Shin is employed by WestJustice, a community legal centre in western Melbourne, to work for four days a week at a P - 12 (i.e full school-age range) college in Hoppers Crossing. His role is in providing legal advice and advocacy for students of the school and their families, ranging from classes about their rights as commuters on public transport right the way up to representing them in court.

So there's the three for today. If you've found a story about "what went right" in your news feed, why not share a link in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/83631.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: tired tired
What Went Right - 7 FEB 2017

Another three stories from my mainstream news feeds about "what went right" rather than "what went wrong".

Farmers and pastoralists celebrate as Gascoyne River reaches Carnarvon by Matt Brann (ABC Rural, Western Australia)

The Gascoyne River, the longest in WA, doesn't always flow all the way to the coast. This year, it is, and farmers in Carnarvon are hoping it'll flow for long enough to refresh aquifers in the region.

Indonesia 'deradicalising' 75 people deported from Turkey over Islamic State links by Adam Harvey (ABC Indonesia correspondent)

A group of 75 people who were deported from Turkey for attempting to join the Islamic State group are currently being counselled and helped with the process of re-integration into their communities by the Indonesian government.

SA merit award students include Blessing Nyoni, who plans to become a doctor by Tom Fedorowytsch (ABC South Australia)

Among the recipients of the SA Merit Award (awarded to the highest achievers in the SA Certificate of Education) is Blessing Nyoni, an immigrant from Zimbabwe.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found any stories from the mainstream media about "what went right" in your newsfeed, why not share them in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/83408.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: busy busy
The Joys of Unemployment: JobActive Providers.

Just got off the phone with my JobActive provider, AtWork Australia.

On January 30th, I attended an appointment with them, where I advised the Employment Consultant I was going to be undertaking tertiary study, and provided them with a copy of my timetable. I have a rather long and spotty history with AtWork - I've been on their books while doing tertiary study before, and one of their more ... endearing traits was their tendency to book me appointments at the office I was registered with (about a 15 minute drive from home) either at times where I was actually supposed to be in a lecture or tutorial, or at times where in order to get from the university campus to their office to be on time for the appointment (a 30 minute drive in good traffic conditions at best) I would have needed to be able to teleport.

I had hoped by providing a copy of my timetable to the Employment Consultant at my appointment on the 30th, I would avoid this particular problem.

I checked my email this morning, and discovered I've been booked with another appointment with them in March - at a time where I'm supposed to be in a lecture at the university campus. So I've just got off the phone from pointing out to their call centre staff that during the periods where I have lectures and tutorials I AM UNAVAILABLE FOR APPOINTMENTS (surely this should be obvious?) as well as the hour either side of those times. Apparently this information hadn't been entered into their system (the fact I was doing classes was entered in, but the actual times of those classes weren't. I'd be disappointed, except the miracle is the classes were entered in at all).

This seems to be a regular feature of their Employment Consultants - they're able to see what's directly in front of them, but they're not able to think past this to what it implies (for example: if someone is doing study, they're not going to be able to attend appointments during the times they're supposed to be in classes; if someone is working, they're not going to be able to attend appointments during the times they're supposed to be at work; etc). I'm thinking the skill is a massive triumph of compartmentalisation, although this may be me winning awards for "Greatest Benefit of Doubt Given".

I'm now wondering whether this is going to result in a re-scheduling of the appointment which is booked for 10am on Monday 20th of March, or whether I'm going to have to sort it out with the local office at the time I go in to drop off my proof of job search.

(Apparently this is all part of the requirements of Mutual Obligation. I'm obliged to supply my brainpower to point out the obvious to their staff, and they're obliged to give me reasons to do so).

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/83079.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: exasperated exasperated
What Went Right - 6 FEB 2017

Another three articles from my mainstream media feeds about "what went right" rather than "what went wrong".

Vintage tractor collection helps keep retired farmer mentally fit by Tyne Logan (ABC Rural, Western Australia)

Mal Beeck of Katanning, Western Australia, has the unusual hobby of collecting and restoring vintage tractors. He says it keeps him mentally healthy during his retirement.

How the Sound of Music’s von Trapp family ended up teaching music in PNG by Jo Chandler (Earshot, ABC Australia)

This one is a deliberate "not bad news" story written by a journalist who has been doing stories about Papua New Guinea for a few years, and wanted to share some of the good things about the region as well as all the "newsworthy" stuff. So she's written about the history of the choir on Fergusson Island, in Milne Bay.

AFL Women's: 'Inspiring' opening round in the words of those who matter by ABC Grandstand (uncredited)

This article is a series of short interviews regarding the first round of the AFLW competition. Most of the interviews are with players, who appear to be overwhelmingly happy they're now able to play this sport on a semi-professional basis; the final interview is with a fan and amateur footballer.

So, there's the three for today. If you've found stories about "what went right" in your media feeds, why not share them in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/82895.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: hopeful hopeful
What Went Right - 5 FEB 2017

Another three stories about "what went right" rather than "what went wrong" from my mainstream media feeds.

Counting whales from space: Researchers monitor migration movements by Erin Parke (ABC Western Australia)

Researchers in Perth are using satellite photos in order to try and get an accurate head-count of the number of humpback whales.

Probiotics in salads probed as solution to Salmonella outbreaks in bagged mixes by Melanie Vujkovic (ABC Queensland)

The University of Queensland, in concert with Horticulture Innovation Australia, have begun a two year investigation into the viability of adding probiotic bacteria to bagged salad mixes as a way of combatting the risk of salmonella from these mixes.

Coffin demand as sure as death and taxes, but size and look of resting place is a different matter by Simon Royal (ABC South Australia)

Coffin making is a relatively recession-proof industry, but there's a surprising amount of variety and interest in the matter. This article is basically a profile of a firm in South Australia which makes coffins from scratch, rather than assembling them from pre-cut components.

So there's your three for the day. If you've found any stories about "what went right" in your media feeds, why not share them in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/82679.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: calm calm
What Went Right - 4 FEB 2017

Sorry this is up so late - unfortunately the "what went right" is being slightly delayed by something going wrong at my end. However, despite that, have three articles from my mainstream media feeds about what went right in the world.

Nigerian 'witch boy' Hope 'happy', 'healthy' a year after being rescued from streets by ABC Australia (uncredited)

A boy who had been abandoned by his family in Nigeria because he was thought to be a "witch" is now attending school and appears to be happy and healthy.

Wheelchair users get first taste of ocean waves with help of special mats by Tom Fedorowytsch (ABC South Australia)

Special mats for making beaches wheelchair-accessible have been rolled out at Adelaide's Henley Beach, allowing wheelchair users to take their chairs down to the water. The mats are currently used at about 10 other patrolled beaches in Australia, but organisers from Accessible Beaches Australia hope to make them a regular sight around the country.

AFL Women's: Carlton, Collingwood deliver excitement in first match as Blues win by ABC Grandstand (uncredited)

The first AFL Women's match was a stand-out success, with lock-out crowds (the gates had to be locked midway through the first quarter for safety reasons, with about 2000 people still outside), and a deafening level of enthusiasm for the players.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found any stories about "what went right" (rather than "what went wrong") in your news feeds, why not share them in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/82344.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: busy busy
What Went Right - 3 FEB 2017

Another day, another three things from the mainstream media about what went right, rather than what went wrong.

NASA's humanoid Robonaught set for work on Woodside Petroleum's WA projects by Tom Wildie (ABC Western Australia)

Woodside Petroleum is being loaned the Robonaut anthropomorphic machine for a period of five years deployment in Western Australia. They plan to use it to "explore how the technology could be used to improve safety, reliability and efficiency in high-risk and remote environments".

Top Indigenous players descend on Broome for much more than 'just footy' by Leah McLennan, Vanessa Mills and Jacqueline Wright (ABC Kimberley, Western Australia)

The AFL Indigenous All-Stars group is in Broome for a four-day camp, which will provide the players with options for networking with each other, connecting with their communities (and with other Indigenous communities), and help the players to help the AFL to help them with their journeys.

Feasibility of reopening Kimberley nickel mine looking good for Panoramic Resources by Matt Brann (ABC Rural, Western Australia)

Panoramic Resources says if the nickel price keeps going up, they're definitely going to be re-starting operations on their Savannah nickel mine, north of Halls Creek.

So there's my three stories for the day. If you've found stories in your news feeds about things going right, why not share them in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/82034.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: okay okay
What Went Right - 2 FEB 2017

Once more, three stories from the mainstream media about "what went right" rather than "what went wrong".

Prince Leonard of Hutt River Principality abdicates to son Graeme by Sarah Tallier (ABC Western Australia)

The monarch of the Hutt River Principality, Prince Leonard, has decided to hand over power in the micro-nation to his son, Prince Graeme, in a peaceful transition.

Heavy rains bring stunning changes to Western Australia's remote desert landscapes by Sam Tomlin (ABC Goldfields, Western Australia)

The rain which has been falling in the North of the state has also penetrated to the interior and the goldfields, making the country greener than it has been in decades. The article is full of photos from Warburton photographer, Jody Brown, showing the transformed landscape.

Flooding rains bring optimism as barramundi season starts in northern Australia by Eric Barker, Mark Jeffery, and Matt Brann (ABC Rural, Queensland, Northern Territory and Western Australia)

Barramundi fishermen are optimistic that the heavy monsoon rains this year will spell a good barramundi season, and will also lead to a good season in a couple of years.

So there's the three for today. If you've found any articles in your mainstream news feeds about "what went right", why not share them in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/81824.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: awake awake
What Went Right - 1 FEB 2017

Another month begins, and to start the month off right, here's another three articles from my mainstream media feeds about "what went right" rather than "what went wrong".

Wet season turning into one of the biggest on record for northern WA by Matt Brann (ABC Rural, Western Australia)

The wet season this year is turning into one of the best on record for a lot of places in Western Australia's far north and North-West.

West Australians embrace solar panels at record rate by Kathryn Diss (ABC Western Australia)

In the face of falling costs for installation, and rising power prices, Western Australians are turning to solar power at a record rate, with installations up 33 percent last year.

Full-time commercial work a step up for the Aboriginal rangers in WA Goldfields by Sam Tomlin (ABC Goldfields, Western Australia)

The Goldfields Land and Sea Council's ranger team has been expanded, and will now have 12 staff in full-time work, with the potential to take on commercial contracts as well as the work they've been doing on Credo Station.

So there's today's three. If you've found stories about "what went right" in your mainstream media feeds, why not share them in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/81590.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: chilly chilly
What Went Right - 31 JAN 2017

Another set of three things from the mainstream media about "what went right", rather than "what went wrong".

WA Government grant to kick start irrigation project on Roebuck Plains cattle station by Matt Brann (ABC Rural, Western Australia)

The Nyamba Buru Yawuru organisation (an Indigenous group) has won a $250,000 grant through the WA Government's "Royalties for Regions" program to irrigate land on Roebuck Plains station, near Broome. The irrigated land will be used to grow fodder for cattle, rather than shipping up fodder from Narrogin in the south-west of the state.

Meet the kids who spend their summer holidays learning Latin by Belinda Sommer (Saturday Extra on ABC RN)

The annual Sydney Latin Summer School attracted 230 people this year. The school is open to people aged 13 and over, giving an opportunity to learn and practice the language. While not actually a preparation course for the HSC or VCE, it can give students for either of those courses a bit of a boost.

Toddler reunited with family after being found alone in Melbourne's west by ABC Victoria (uncredited)

"A three-year-old boy found alone in the front yard of a home at Melton, west of Melbourne, late last night has been reunited with his family."

So there's my three for today. If you've found stories in your news feeds which are about "what went right" rather than "what went wrong", why not share a link to them in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/81313.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: indescribable indescribable
What Went Right - 30 JAN 2017

Another three articles from the mainstream media about "what went right", rather than "what went wrong".

WA film industry: Australian outback adventure and Tim Winton adaptation set for state by Tim Wildie (ABC Western Australia)

The Western Australian film industry is getting a bit of a boost this year, with two films (one by a Hollywood producer) and a television series to be filmed in the state.

Back Roads in Harrow: How Johnny Mullagh led Australia's first international and Indigenous team by Brigid Donovan (Back Roads, ABC)

(Warning: The video and the pictures in this article contain images of deceased people). A brief profile of the town of Harrow in Western Victoria, which is home to a museum commemorating the first ever Australian cricket team to tour internationally. An all-Aboriginal team toured England in 1868, more than a decade before the match which gave birth to the Ashes cricketing rivalry.

Miracle milestone: premature triplets start first day of school by Margaret Burin (ABC Queensland)

A group of triplets who were born after 26 weeks of pregnancy (3 and a half months early) are having their first day of school this year.

So there's my three for the day. If you've found some stories about "what went right" in your mainstream media feeds, why not share them in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/81093.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: busy busy
What Went Right - 29 JAN 2017

Once again, three stories from the mainstream media about "what went right" rather than "what went wrong".

WA leads nation with free meningococcal vaccination for teenagers by Eliza Laschon (ABC Western Australia)

Following an increase in the number of meningococcal disease infections in WA over the past year, the decision has been taken to provide a vaccination against the disease to teenagers between the ages of 15 and 19 free of charge. Year 10, 11 and 12 students will receive the single dose vaccination at school, while 18 and 19 year olds can visit community health clinics to receive their dose of the vaccine.

Card gamers turn passion into round-the-world ticket to play by Alkira Reinfrank (ABC Australian Capital Territory)

This article is a profile of Jim Frank, who plays the collectable card game "Magic: The Gathering" at a professional level; and Andrew Haidon, who plays the wargames "Warmachine" and "Hordes" at the professional level as well. Sometimes you can make a living out of your hobby!

MND inspires Tasmanian to complete epic kayak circumnavigation of island state by Rhiannon Shine (ABC Tasmania)

Craig Machen has raised more than $43,000 for Motor Neurone Disease Tasmania through sponsorship for completing a circumnavigation of Tasmania in a kayak.

So there's today's stories. If you've found any stories about "what went right" in your news feeds, why not share them in the comments?.

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/80869.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: hopeful hopeful
What Went Right - 28 JAN 2017

Once again, three stories from the mainstream media about "what went right" rather than "what went wrong".

Blue Mountains rescue: Woman freed six hours after becoming trapped in canyon by ABC New South Wales (uncredited)

"Emergency services have rescued a woman who spent six hours trapped in a canyon in the New South Wales Blue Mountains."

Maritime museum push for Lady Barron to showcase Furneaux Islands' shipwreck 'graveyard' by Rosemary Grant (ABC Tasmania)

The Furneaux Maritime History Association is trying to pull together funding and facilities for a maritime museum focussed on the shipwrecks in the Furneaux islands.

Australia leads international push to protect far eastern curlew from extinction by Felicity James (PM, ABC Radio)

Australian researchers are leading an international research effort (including countries such as Japan, China, Russia and South Korea) to discover more about the life cycle of the Far Eastern Curlew, a threatened shore bird. At present, it's hard to tell where to direct efforts at preservation, because not enough is known about the bird.

And there's the three for today. If you've found stories about "what went right" in your news feeds, why not share them in the comments?

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/80513.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: calm calm
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