megpie71
megpie71
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Back June 23rd, 2015 Forward
Another Employment Scammer

Apparently-From: Kieran Sanchez (ni@jytaijin.com)
Subject: [Bulk] Employment opportunity : (0985546390441)
Reply-To: Kieran Sanchez (Kuksenko.Evgeniya@gmail.com)

Our company is glad to propose you to taking the office of a customer care manager. Please keep in mind, this is a beginner level office.

Job functions:

Supplying cellular service providers with a new commercial platform by our corporation.
User support and consultation.
Processing requests attributed to our platform icommerce.
Primary aid to our consumers in terms of working within the system.

We provide practice and a trial period.
Applicants are not needed bear peculiar experience with the system iCommerce or analogical systems.

Qualification and proficiency:
- Amenity and the ability of communicating with people
- Carefulness to details
- Skills in writing and editing of corporate-type texts due skills is a pro
- Time-management ability
- Flexibility, sufferance, sobriety

Paying conditions:
A monthly salary of 4000AUD for general working day or up to 2500AUD for part-time employment.

Practice period is remunerated.

It takes three weeks. You will get 400AUD a week.

During the process of instructions, you will familiarize with all operating stage regarding Icommerce platform. In the future, that will provide you the opportunity to orientate yourself and respond to all client matters easily .

If you are interested, we are eager to deliver you some additional information.

If we deem you an appropriate job applicant, we will contact you in the short term.

---
Это сообщение проверено на вирусы антивирусом Avast.
http://www.avast.com


So, scam flags flying:

1) Job "opportunity" sent at random to someone who isn't actually looking for work (I haven't been actively looking for work for about eight to ten months now). In a contracting job market (which we have at the moment - there are more unemployed people than there are jobs to go to) a legitimate employer doesn't need to be sending out recruiting letters at random.

2) Paying too much for the (poorly-described) work they're asking you to do. The wage they're offering is approximately $25 per hour ($4000 per month, divided by four weeks, divided by forty hours per week), and the work they appear to be offering is mostly either low-level stuff you'd expect to be paying minimum wage for, or the kind of thing you'd be expecting to employ much more qualified support staff for.

3) No mention of the company name (the mention of "avast" at the bottom is purely saying the Avast anti-virus program was used to scan it for viruses) or indeed of any company information at all.

4) "From" and "Reply-To" addresses are different domains, and appear to be different people (the "From" address is for a machinery company in China; the Reply-to is a gmail throwaway with an Eastern-European sounding name; neither of these match the name given for the person sending the emails).

5) Marked "[Bulk]" by Yahoo's email systems as it went through, so even though the email is apparently addressed to me, I'm betting they're actually sending the email to a large list of people.

6) Whoever wrote the body text speaks English as probably about a second language at best, possibly third or fourth. The grammar isn't appropriate, the word usage is clumsy, and there are a number of rather obvious mistakes in both.

If you've received one of these, the normal drill applies. Don't reply, don't send them anything, and don't take the job. If I receive more of them, I'll put the Apparently-From, Subject Line, and Reply-To addresses in comments below. If anyone reading this has received one and wants to add to the list, feel free.

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/54753.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: awake awake
From the Department of "Didn't See THAT One Coming"...

'Urgent' need for another public secondary school in Perth's western suburbs, Education Minister says

Back in 1999 - 2000, the state government of Western Australia, led by Richard Court (Liberal) closed three public high schools in Perth's Western Suburbs, citing lack of enrolments and lack of demand for the facilities. In 1999, Scarborough Senior High School closed down, and in 2000 Swanbourne Senior High School and Hollywood Senior High School (in Nedlands) were closed down and their student bodies merged into Shenton College. The land they stood on was sold off to developers, who later sold it on at a profit as premium housing in the prestigious Western suburbs.

The education minister at the time was one Colin Barnett.

Now, eleven years later, there's apparently urgent need for at least one more state high school in Perth's western suburbs, because the two state-run facilities which remain, Churchlands Senior High School (in Churchlands) and Shenton College (near Subiaco) are bulging at the seams and running out of facilities for students. There's going to be a need for another 1,417 spaces by 2020. The current (Liberal) state government, under Premier Colin Barnett, appears somewhat surprised by this.

Kids grow up, who knew?

Unfortunately, the cost of land in the Western suburbs is sky-high (which is why all those high schools were closed in the first place - where else was the government going to find prime real estate for the developers to sell off?). The government is looking at space in City Beach (and probably wincing, shuddering and bleeding when they consider the cost, given land prices in the area), but they're constrained by the fact that at the end of the mining boom, the coffers are suddenly empty. All the money's been spent. Including, one must add, all the money they earned from selling off those school sites in the first place.

See, the thing about schools is this: demand for school places in a particular region is cyclical. You'll get times when you have a high population of students, because your suburbs are full of young families settling in with their kids, and needing things like primary and secondary schools, sporting grounds and so on. That'll last for maybe a couple of decades, and then there'll be a bit of a gap, where the demand dries up a bit, because all those kids you put through the school system have grown up and are getting started on their own lives, and moving away from their parents' homes. But if you hang about for a bit (maybe about a decade or two), you'll find that once again, you're going to need those school facilities, because the original parents will be selling up and downsizing, selling their family houses to young families who want to buy in the area because of things like access to schools! Bingo! You have a new generation coming up who want things like schooling.

A school building is a long-term investment, something you build for three or four generations, not just one. They're specialist assets to the region, which attract people to suburbs, rather than simply being drains on the public purse. Even if the demand for the school is low at present, it will increase in ten to twenty years. Even if the need for the school is declining this decade, in another ten to twenty years, it'll be back on the rise again.

This is why you don't sell off schools. It costs you far more in the long run than you'll ever make in the short term.

This entry was originally posted at http://megpie71.dreamwidth.org/54895.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Current Mood: cynical cynical
Back June 23rd, 2015 Forward